Books that Shape Us: One Student Reflects on Four Years

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This week, Humanities House Resident-Scholar Mady McColm gets us to think about reading in college.  What have you read recently that has affected your experience of being human in the world? Check out Mady’s list below! “Works that I read in undergrad that profoundly affected me” Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer The Reader by Bernhard Schlink The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros Two or Three Things I Know for Sure…

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Opening Your Eyes to the Realities of Sex Trafficking

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Rachel Lloyd’s Girls Like Us is a memoir concerning the problem of sex trafficking. As she recounts her own story and the stories of girls that she has worked with in the sex industry over the years, she brings to light how relevant and dire the situation truly is. Hundreds of thousands of girls are constantly being bought for sex across the country. Law enforcement gives little help to these girls because, although they are…

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Running Backward: A Critique of “Unbroken.”

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After my first year in college, I am displeased to announce that I have been wrong about a lot of things. In fact, I owe quite a few apologies. I, like many humans, am subject to viewing the world through my bias. For years, I have worked as an advocate within LGBTQ+ organizations. I strive to practice tolerance and acceptance of others in all that I do. If my first year in college taught me…

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Invisibility is Everywhere

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The Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison, opens with the narrator, stating, “I am an invisible man” (Ellison, 1). The narrator is “invisible” because society cannot see him for who he is; people only see the color of his skin. The narrator goes on to elaborate, “I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me” (Ellison, 1). Its people’s inability to see past their prejudices that has forced him into invisibility. The narrator is…

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