2015-2016 Speaker Series

Unable to attend Dr. Roger Whitson’s talk, “Steampunk, Labor, and the Humanities”?  You can still watch the talk online here!

 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 5:30 PM

Reed Auditorium, The Trustee Science Center
Drury Lane, Drury University
Free and Open to the Public

Steampunk, Labor, and the Humanities
Dr. Roger Whitson, Washington State University

What attention should be paid to the working conditions of people who create our technological devices? Steampunk, a genre of science fiction that shows how history could have been otherwise if events happened differently, offers a unique answer to this question. Steampunk draws on the technology and culture of the Victorian period in Great Britain to get us to think about the present. Whitson discusses steampunk literature that reintroduces the plight of the London workers to contemporary audiences; this literature imagines a Victorian world where computers create new opportunities for both oppression and revolution. Whitson argues that alternate histories of Victorian London invite us to think about how labor movements intersect with the production and distribution of our own technology. In doing so, he prods us to think about not only how we the use of technology shapes our experience of being human today, but also about the lives of those who create the technology we use in our work and play.

Dr. Roger Whitson (Drury, ’00) is Assistant Professor of English at Washington State University where he also teaches in the Digital Technology and Culture program. He is the co-author of William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media, and author of Steampunk and Nineteenth-Century Digital Humanities: Literary Retrofuturism, Alternate History, and Physical Computing (forthcoming, Routledge).

Made possible by a grant from the 

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 12:00 PM
Hoblitt Suite
Faculty Workshop: An Introduction to the Digital Humanities
Dr. Roger Whitson

What are the Digital Humanities, and why might a small liberal arts college incorporate them into its institution?
How might digital methodologies contribute to Drury’s mission in the Humanities, and in teaching and learning more broadly? What are the pros and cons of doing so?

Dr. Roger Whitson is Assistant Professor of English at Washington State University where he also teaches in the Digital Technology and Culture program. He is the co-author of William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media, and author of Steampunk and Nineteenth-Century Digital Humanities: Literary Retrofuturism, Alternate History, and Physical Computing (forthcoming, Routledge).

Lunch will be provided. Faculty can register for the event by emailing Katie Gilbert, kgilbert@drury.edu or Erin Kenny, ekenny@drury.edu.

Made possible by a grant from the 

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Please check back for additional details on our speaker series this fall!

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