Humanities Speaker Series

The Humanities Division’s mission is to promote the humanities and take it out of the classroom and into the world.  In  Spring 2014, we created an exciting set of activities around the theme of “Revolutionary Humanities!” The theme captures the fact that much of the research, topics, and subject matter within the Humanities is novel, innovative, and world-shaping. We engaged the theme in two different ways. First, a book reading series ran throughout the semester to discuss revolutionary books and poetry. In addition, and with the generous funding support of the Missouri Humanities Council and Drury University, we hosted two speakers. In March, Dr. Adam Potthast (Associate Professor of Philosophy at Park University) gave a lecture entitled “The Dark Side of Human Rights: Should We Defend Rape Jokes, Fred Phelps, and Intolerant Cultures?” In April, Dr. Caroline Levine (Professor of English at University of Wisconsin at Madison),  delivered “Provoking Democracy: Why We Need the Humanities and the Arts.” The day after their public lectures, each speaker participated in a panel discussion.  Craig Titus (Visiting Professor of Philosophy and English) and Stephanie Perkins of PROMO joined Potthast for a discussion of free speech; and Richard Schur (Professor of English at Drury) and Nick Nelson (Director of the Springfield Art Museum) joined Levine to discuss the impact of the arts and humanities in the public sphere.

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March 10th, 5:30pm, Washington Avenue Church on Drury Lane

 

Dr. Adam Potthast, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Park University

“The Dark Side of Human Rights: Should We Defend Rape Jokes, Fred Phelps, and Intolerant Cultures?””

 

March 31st, 5:30pm, Washington Avenue Church on Drury Lane

 

Dr. Caroline Levine, Professor of English at University of Wisconsin @ Madison

“Provoking Democracy: Why We Need the Humanities and the Arts”

 

The Drury University Humanities Speaker Series is funded by the Humanities and Ethics Center and by the Missouri Humanities Council

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