Series: “The Importance of the Humanities” Post #1: Why Teach English?

Today introduces the first post in what will be a 5-part series reproducing a very important discussion going on recently in some of America’s most important and widely-read publications. The topic is “the importance of the humanities,” and the authors are some of the most esteemed benefactors and purveyors of the humanities, but the opinions of these writers appear alongside those who write from a different perspective, and who wish to urge caution to readers…

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At Home and Abroad: Intercultural Engagement on Campus

At the beginning of this semester, I was introduced to a new part of Drury’s identity. I became a mentor with the English for Academic Purposes program, which is designed alongside the International Students Association to help students acclimate to college life and academic expectations within the United States. Initially, I did not anticipate the effects that the program and its participants would have on me, or the things that I would learn from them.…

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Seeing All That is In Between

Recently, I read Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me. Coates writes about the realities of his life as a black man in America, and he manages to do so in ways that are both deeply personal and specific while also helping readers to see that his experience is not singular. The book is in the form of a letter to his son, lending it a type of intimacy and honesty that we often can…

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A Darkness too Deep: The 9/11 Memorial

I visited the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City this summer. I wanted badly for it to work.  It did not. Good memorials allow us to have a profound emotional experience that brings us to a greater understanding of what it was like to have been there. They provide a sense of closure to a complex and difficult historical moment.  They touch us both as individuals and as members of the…

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